Don’t Let Diabetes Sneak Up on You: Know These 6 Early Signs

It’s estimated that more than 34 million people in the United States have diabetes. But of those 34 million, nearly 8 million are undiagnosed. 

Could you be among those who have diabetes and don’t know it? 

At Healthstone Primary Care, with offices in Weston, Pembroke Pines, and Davie, Florida, our board-certified family medicine physician, Dr. Hector Fabregas, and our team of compassionate providers specialize in diagnosing and treating diabetes. Through our primary care services, we can spot the early signs and symptoms of chronic diseases like diabetes.

Here, we want to share some of the early signs and symptoms of diabetes so you can take action now.

1. More hungry than usual

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose levels are higher than normal. The glucose in your blood comes from the food you eat and serves as the primary source of energy for all the cells in your body. 

Diabetes occurs because of problems with insulin, which is the hormone that helps get the glucose from your blood into your cells. When the glucose is unable to get into your cells, they “starve,” making you feel extra hungry. 

If you feel more hungry than usual, and eating fails to satisfy your appetite, it may be time to schedule a primary care appointment. 

2. Losing weight without trying

You’re always hungry, you’re always eating, and you’re dropping pounds like crazy. Though this may be a dream come true, it may also mean you have diabetes.

When your cells can’t get glucose for energy, it burns your body’s fat stores, leading to weight loss. 

3. Making more trips to the bathroom

An increase in urination is one of the most common early signs of diabetes. Your kidneys help filter out glucose from your blood and then eliminate it through your urine. When your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, your kidneys need to make more urine to get rid of all that extra sugar.

In addition to your frequent visits to the bathroom, you may have an insatiable thirst. 

4. Feeling exhausted all the time

Glucose provides energy for your body. Without that energy, you may feel chronically tired. Dehydration (from your frequent urination) may exacerbate your fatigue. 

5. Worsening vision

Blurry vision is also one of the early signs of diabetes. When your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, your eyes pull in water, causing the lens to swell. This swelling changes the shape of your eye and its ability to focus, worsening your vision. 

6. Tingling in your fingers or toes

The extra glucose in your blood affects almost every part of your body, including your blood vessels and nerves. Damage from diabetes usually affects the smaller blood vessels and nerves first, like those found in your hands and feet.

Tingling, burning, numbness, or pain in your fingers or toes may indicate nerve damage and be a warning sign that something is off.

These early signs of diabetes may be subtle and go unnoticed or dismissed as something else. The best way to prevent diabetes from sneaking up on you is to make sure you schedule your annual wellness visit

During this visit, we review your general health and screen for common health problems like diabetes. If we discover you’re at risk of developing diabetes, we may be able to prevent it altogether.

Don’t let diabetes sneak up on you. Call our office most convenient to you or request an appointment online today. 

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